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All arguments to keep corporal punishment alive, are intellectually bankrupt.

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CREEPS

There are grown men in our society who are nothing short of creepy. It’s these educators who regularly get behind closed doors, tell a cute teenage girl to expose her backside to him in a vulnerable way, and he spanks her with a paddle. We should do a public opinion poll and see what America as a whole thinks of these creepy men. Then, again educators who paddle kids have no pride. They don’t care what people think of them. These men bring girl’s to tears, and they rejoice, proud of their accomplishments. If a girl complains about the pain these creeps are causing, these men show their true colors. They threaten to beat her more with the paddle. In states where school corporal punishment is still legal. There are no laws to protect girls from these monsters. The laws protect the potential perverts.
In my opinion, any man who would stoop to such a level is not much of man. He’s a coward. I’ll tell to his face if he will stick his cowardly face in front of mine. If you are a victim to one of these creeps, give us your story if you can bear it. And also give us the name of the coward who did this to you. We want to post their name on our web-log and other places on the internet. School boards who support this kind of abuse are just as big of cowards. I will tell it to their face, too.
If you disagree with me and my colleagues, we challenge you to a debate. We have the means to video tape the debate and post it on you-tube. All educators who paddle and their supporters will not debate us. They are pure cowards. They know the arguments they use to keep this barbaric, primitive means of discipline alive are intellectually bankrupt.

EVIL WOMEN

TEACHERS WHO PADDLE is a creepy website. Four women operate this site. These women are evil. They use fake names on the internet. I want to know their real names, and expose them to the media. They’ve given some description of themselves online. One is a short woman with Auburn hair. She claims to be an assistant principal in a middle school. The other is an attractive woman. She teachers either the 4th  or 5th grade. I think she is a blond. She claims to be a former cheerleader at the University of Alabama. Her Daddy is wealthy, and she is married to a doctor. Both, are employed in a school district in Georgia. Please, let me know if you know who these evil woman are.

WHY IS PADDLING STILL ALLOWED IN SCHOOLS?
Two Texas mothers set off a firestorm recently when they complained that a male assistant principal had severely paddled their daughters. One of the mothers pointed out that school policy required that officials of the same sex as the student do the paddling. Now the school board has responded — by dropping the rule requiring paddlers and students to be of the same sex.
In other words, the Springtown Independent School District decided to expand corporal punishment, a move in precisely the wrong direction. Education experts are in wide agreement that physical punishment in schools is ill-advised: it is unequally meted out, it can cause serious mental and physical harm, and it is not as effective as other kinds of discipline.
To residents of much of the U.S., beating schoolchildren sounds like a throwback to the nation’s distant past. In New Jersey, corporal punishment has been illegal since 1867, and in many school districts it has not been heard of for decades. The campaign to ban corporal punishment hit its stride in the 1980s and ’90s, when more than 20 states — including big ones like New York and California — adopted bans.
There are now just 19 states that allow corporal punishment in schools, but that still leaves a lot of students being paddled, hit or otherwise physically punished. In the 2005-06 school year, according to the Center for Effective Discipline, more than 223,000 students received corporal punishment. In Mississippi, the No. 1 state for corporal punishment, 7.5% of students were physically disciplined. In Arkansas and Alabama, 4.7% and 4.5% were, respectively.
Corporal punishment is not just a few raps on the knuckles with a ruler. It often means hitting a student on the bottom with a wooden paddle using considerable force. The mother of one of the Texas girls said that after her daughter was paddled, her bottom “almost looked like it had been burned and blistered, it was so bad.”
There have been reports of students suffering worse injuries, including blood clots and broken bones. The ACLU and Human Rights Watch described the case of Tim L., a Texas fifth-grader who was beaten so brutally in 2003 that his genitals were bruised and swollen and his mother reported having to “pull the underwear off his behind from the dried blood.”
Corporal punishment has been linked to mental-health problems in children. Studies have found that children who receive physical punishment are more likely to experience depression, suicide and antisocial behavior. A Canadian study published this year found a connection between corporal punishment and alcohol and drug abuse.
The case in favor of corporal punishment is remarkably thin. Supporters often invoke the injunction “Spare the rod, spoil the child,” or simply point to the long tradition of paddling children and say they see no reason to stop now. But there is not a great deal of social-science evidence that paddling promotes better outcomes — and there is quite a bit that it does the reverse. Education experts say physical punishment instills a climate of fear in the classroom and is associated with students skipping class and dropping out of school.
There was a time when critics of corporal punishment hoped that the courts would block its use. But the Supreme Court dealt those hopes a serious blow in 1977, when it ruled in Ingraham v. Wright that in-school corporal punishment does not violate the 8th Amendment’s prohibition on cruel and unusual punishment.
The strongest force working against corporal punishment right now is a simple one: public opinion. Even among people who spank their children, having school officials paddle students is not popular. In an ABC News poll, 72% of respondents opposed physical punishment in grade schools. Even in the South, where corporal punishment is most common, just 35% were in favor.
New state laws against corporal punishment keep coming. Ohio adopted a ban in 2009, and New Mexico adopted one in 2011. But even with this momentum, it could be many years before all states ban the practice. That is why Congress should enact a national ban on corporal punishment in schools, like the one that Representative Carolyn McCarthy of New York has proposed. Children in Mississippi and Arkansas — and Texas — should not continue to be beaten just because their states remain committed to a barbaric practice.

GROWING MOVEMENT WOULD BAN CORPORAL PUNISHMENT IN SCHOOLS.
NASHVILLE, Tenn. – How would you feel about a teacher paddling your child in class? If you think it can’t happen in Tennessee — you’re wrong. This is one of 19 states to allow paddling in schools.

Believe it or not, paddling used to be the norm in schools, but if you think wood paddles are a thing of the past, think again.
Some say it’s good, old-fashioned discipline. Others call it child abuse, and now there’s a federal lawsuit. Corporal punishment is an ongoing controversy that has some parents and teachers on different sides of the fence. So, would you allow a teacher to paddle your child?
The law is on the books allowing it, but now there is a federal lawsuit involving a Cumberland County teacher challenging corporal punishment in Tennessee schools. The debate over unruly kids and discipline is raging.
“Corporal punishment in Tennessee is still an option, legally an option,” says Wendell Marlowe. Marlowe is the principal at West Wilson Middle School in Wilson County. Many principals, like Marlowe, keep a paddle in their offices. Marlowe won’t use his, but there are some who do.
It’s been two years since he’s spanked a student and Marlowe doubts he will ever do it again even if asked. “Parents have come to me and said, ‘Mr. Marlow, if they don’t have their homework in – paddle them.’ Well, I’m not going to do that,” says Marlow.
Tennessee law allows it, but Marlow is among a growing number of principals who believe paddling should be a thing of the past. That’s not to say it doesn’t still happen. There’s an entire website dedicated to cellphone video of school paddlings from around the country, corpun.com.
“It’s actually government sanctioned child abuse. It’s legally child abuse,” says Julie Worley, President for Tennesseans for Non-Violent School Discipline. “The federal government has prohibited corporal punishment in our prisons and yet they fail to enact a law to protect children in our schools.”
Worley says paddling traumatizes students and can cost schools big money. She points to a federal lawsuit filed in October against Homestead Elementary in Cumberland County. A now-former teacher, Vaughn Davis, was accused of paddling a student who suffered from health problems.
“This child was on the no paddle list, and the corporal punishment (was) administered in violation of their own policies,” says Worley. “Mr. Davis took him outside and had him bend over a rock and paddled him three times.” The family is seeking half a million dollars in damages.
Worley sees more lawsuits coming since there are few guidelines for schools to follow. She says there’s not even a standard paddle. It’s a practice that could easily be abused or be taken too far. Even so, Tennessee lawmakers seem unwilling to ban paddling. Clearly there are voters who still support it.
“I think we are too lax,” says Albert Bell, who allowed his kids to be paddled and he’d do the same with his grandchildren. “These young children don’t have any respect. You had it back then. It was whooped into you.”
That was then. This is now. Law or no law, principals like Marlowe plan to hang up their paddles for good. “Hitting a kid with a piece of wood is ridiculous,” says Marlowe.
In Tennessee, individual school districts are allowed to determine their own policies with regard to corporal punishment. Some ban it while others allow it, usually with parental permission first. If you’re not sure about your district that’s a question worth asking your child’s principal.

EXPOSE TEACHERSWHOPADDLE
Four creepy women operate the perverted weblog, Teacherswhopaddle. These redneck women are doing nothing but promoting sadism and hatred. They hate with a passion anybody who disagrees with their very narrow and self-righteous philosophy. They are teaching their own children to hate. Kids they paddle are no different than a Jew was to a Nazis. These women are disgusting. They are true blue cowards. They get on the internet bragging about beating kids with a paddle, and they use alias names. They don’t tell us who they are or where they work. Help us find out what their real names. They live in the state of Georgia. The one who calls herself, Renee on the internet, describes herself as a petite, red head. She identifies herself as an assistant principal at a middle school. Another one of these creepy women vainly claims to be a Jessica Simpson look alike. This woman is either a fourth or fifth grade teachers. She says she is a former cheerleader at the University of Alabama, and she is married to a doctor. If you know the names of these sinister women, let us know. Their weblog is an encourager to other redneck, educators who paddle. If we can learn their real names, many children will be saved from being beat at school. Help us save the children.

IS SPRINGTOWN’S PADDLING POLICY NONE OF OUR BUSINESS?
Boohoo for poor Springtown, a Parker County farm burg that just wishes the rest of the world would mind its own business. Naturally, there are times when it’s entirely necessary for an adult male school administrator to take a teenage girl to a private room, bend her over a desk and paddle her with a board with enough force to create bruises and welts.
Why in the world do buttinski, know-it-all reporters from out of town keep making such a big deal about it? Good grief, they act like it’s somehow primitive, or even a little bit creepy, for a grownman to whale on the adolescent behind of somebody else’s daughter. What dirty minds those mainstream media types have!
Heck, in Springtown, paddling’s just a kind of bonus service, sorta like free lunch if a kid needs it. “They’ll call us up and tell us, when their child commits an infraction, that parent will call up and tell that principal, ‘Why don’t you just give ’em a swat?’ ” Superintendent Michael Kelley helpfully explained to a San Antonio-based reporter for Reuters.
All this came about after two parents (distraught moms, both of ’em) objected to the paddling of their daughters — one 15, the other 16 — by a male vice principal. The discipline violated the school district’s own policy, which permits corporal punishment only if the official administering the paddling is the same gender as the child on the receiving end.
In both cases, the mothers said they sanctioned corporal punishment, but A) Thought it would be administered by a woman and B) Did not expect a “swat” to inflict bruises and blisters. Rather than express horror that a grown man was violating policy by spanking teen girls at school, the Springtown school board fixed the problem this week by changing the policy.
Now, mixed-gender paddlings are A-OK, as long as a parent gives permission and a same-gender witness is present, rather like the nurse in the ob/gyn exam room. Kelley brightly described this as a big step forward for gender equality. It ensures that boys and girls will be treated equally, instead of letting some girls slip by with the presumably less-vigorous quality of a beating administered by a female administrator, or perhaps letting some boys entirely off the hook with no beating at all.
“In our middle school, there is only a female assistant principal,” Kelley explained to Reuters. “If the old policy remains in place, then the parents of the boys at the middle school would not be able to request corporal punishment.”
Well, where schools are concerned, spanking is a white-hot political topic second only to praying. It highlights the yawning divide between people who believe any corporal punishment of any kid, ever, equals child abuse, and those who believe the failure to inflict a little enduring pain every now and then equals child neglect.
My parents, for the record, believed in the efficacy of spanking for kids during the grade-school years, a privilege they did not delegate to schools and which was dispensed more in a manner to induce mortification than pain.
I wouldn’t presume to tell people they may not administer the occasional corrective butt swat to their own children.
Still, people with fond good-old-days recollections about the tune of the hickory stick tend to be those who have not been on its receiving end in a good long while. And it’s worth noting that use of corporal punishment (defined as corrective action purposely intended to inflict pain) is legally prohibited against members of the armed service, prisoners of war, arrestees and convicted criminals.
As vocal as the pro-whuppin’ lobby remains, the practice of spanking in schools is falling out of fashion. Texas is one of only 19 states where it is still permitted, and it’s generally confined to smaller rural districts.
Springtown, in loosening its policy for who may administer corporal punishment, at least reset its default position. Previously, parents who didn’t want their children paddled at school had to take the active step to opt out of the policy in writing. Now permission-to-paddle must be specifically submitted instead of withheld.
Nonetheless, it might avoid misunderstandings in the future if parents are asked to do their own paddling. There are a lot of ways for schools to punish kids: detention, suspension, “writing lines,” loss of privileges. Different tactics work with different children.
Taking corporal punishment off the table might help avoid misunderstandings, the kind that come when grown men are permitted to paddle pubescent girls. It might also drag districts like Springtown a little closer to the 21st century.
That way, the rest of us could just mind our own business. Is Springtown’s paddling policy none of our business?

COMMENT: The Springtown School District operates using federal money. When you dip into federal funds, it’s every American’s business what you do. Every school district in America gets federal funds. They must answer to every American. If they don’t want to hear our strong opinions, tell them to keep their hands out of our pockets.

OUR STUDENTS DESERVE BETTER
By Eileen Eady
Three young boys waited on a wooden bench in a brown-paneled office on the hot May day. Anton stretched his legs out and slouched back, his face blank and eyes flashing with anger. Next to him sat Reggie, whose brown eyes darted around the room nervously. He was not a student I usually saw in the office. The third boy, Derek, was crying.
He was hunched forward with his head in his hands, and I could see the tears hitting the floor. I wanted to go over and talk to him, but I was new and didn’t want to be seen coddling the kids in the office.
The teacher came out of the assistant principal’s office with a wooden paddle in her hand. She was sweating and out of breath.
“Let’s go. Let’s get this over with,” she said pointing at Anton. He got up and followed her, strutting.
“Thwack, thwack, thwack.”
“The sound vibrated off the walls, and I became nauseous. Anton sauntered out of the office. Reggie got up and went in. I could hear soft murmuring from behind the door, then the sound again.
“Thwack, thwack, thwack.”
“With each strike, my stomach jumped. I wasn’t emotionally prepared for this.
Derek was more upset now. He kept rubbing his face and running his hands over his black curly hair. Then Reggie came out of the office crying, the teacher followed him, still holding the paddle. She pointed at Derek and said: “Let’s go. Your turn.”
“No, please. No,” Derek cried.
The teacher came toward him, and the assistant principal followed her out. They each took one of Derek’s hands and half carried, half dragged him into the office. He screamed and pleaded the entire 15 feet from the bench to the door. The assistant principal shut the door, and from inside I could hear Derek’s pleading continue.
“Please. Don’t give me licks. I won’t do it again. I’m sorry. Please no,” Derek said.
Soft murmuring followed, and then the “thwack, thwack, thwack” again.
I was sick to my stomach. Never in my 10-year career in public schools had I witnessed a paddling. Not even in inner-city Baltimore.
I was angry for the students, and as a mother I was outraged. I never got used to hearing that sound. Not that day, and not on the spring day when the two male assistant principals took to giving “licks” in the hallway. Four times during first period, and then four more times during second period, they disrupted my class with the paddling. I thought the school administration had lost their minds. Later, the principal told me that she had sent out the two men to “tighten up a little” and get the students under control.
No one was under control that day. The random widespread paddling only amped up the agitation at school.
Mississippi has the highest rate of corporal punishment in the United States, and its use of corporal punishment is inconsistent and unfair. African American boys in Mississippi are punished 1.7 times more than would be expected based on their population. Yet there is no research that shows that African American boys are 1.7 times more likely to misbehave in school. Corporal punishment is not allowed in the prison system, yet it is an acceptable way to discipline students in 23 states.
Corporal punishment has no place in our schools. There is no research that proves it is effective at preventing misbehavior in students. In fact, eight of the states that have the highest corporal punishment rates are ranked among the top 10 states with the highest incarceration rates.
And its use is arbitrary. Some schools paddle students for leaving homework at home, while others reserve it for fights.
It escapes my comprehension that schools adopt a zero-tolerance policy toward bullying but don’t hesitate to hit a child on the buttocks with a wooden board. Violence of any kind should not be tolerated. By allowing students to be paddled in school, we are sending them a message that violence is OK as long as someone in authority is doing it. It is an archaic and lazy way of handling discipline issues.
School systems all over the country find ways of disciplining without violence. Research-based systems of positive intervention and behavior management are proven and effective. From New York to San Diego, these techniques are implemented with success.
Our students in Mississippi deserve the same treatment. Students in Mississippi deserve an education free of violence.

HELP US SAVE THE CHILDREN
The story above shows educators who paddle are monsters. What they did to these children is unforgivable? Help us stop this brutality. Mississippi schools have a high percent of corporal punishment, but they have the worst schools in America. Give us your opinion. Join the Hitting Stops Here and volunteer your time. Together we can save the children.

EXPOSE TEACHERSWHOPADDLE
Four creepy women operate the perverted weblog, Teacherswhopaddle. These redneck women are doing nothing but promoting sadism and hatred. They hate with a passion anybody who disagrees with their very narrow and self-righteous philosophy. They are teaching their own children to hate. Kids they paddle are no different than a Jew was to a Nazis. These women are disgusting. They are true blue cowards. They get on the internet bragging about beating kids with a paddle, and they use alias names. They don’t tell us who they are or where they work. Help us find out what their real names. They live in the state of Georgia. The one who calls herself, Renee on the internet, describes herself as a petite, red head. She identifies herself as an assistant principal at a middle school. Another one of these creepy women vainly claims to be a Jessica Simpson look alike. This woman is either a fourth or fifth grade teachers. She says she is a former cheerleader at the University of Alabama, and she is married to a doctor. If you know the names of these sinister women, let us know. Their weblog is an encourager to other redneck, educators who paddle. If we can learn their real names, many children will be saved from being beat at school. Help us save the children.

TWO MAD MOTHERS
Two Texas mothers set off a firestorm recently when they complained that a male assistant principal had severely paddled their daughters. One of the mothers pointed out that school policy required that officials of the same sex as the student do the paddling. Now, the school board has responded – by dropping the rule requiring paddlers and students be of the same sex. In other words, the Springtown Independent School District decided to expand corporal punishment – a move in precisely the wrong direction. Educational experts are in wide agreement that physical punishment in schools is ill advised – that it is unequally meted out, that it can cause serious mental and physical harm, and that it is not effective as other kinds of discipline. To residents of much of the country, beating school children sounds like a throwback to the nation’s distant past. In New Jersey, corporal punishment has been illegal since 1867, and in many school districts it has not been heard of for decades. The campaign to ban corporal punishment hit its stride in the 1980s and 1990s, when more than 20 states – including big ones like New York and California – adopted bans.
There are now just 19 states that allow corporal punishment in schools – but that still leaves a lot of students being paddled, hit, or otherwise physically punished. In the 2005-6 school year, according to the Center for Effective Discipline, more than 223,000 students received corporal punishment. In Mississippi, the number-one state, 7.5% of students were physically disciplined, according to the CED. In Arkansas and Alabama, 4.7% and 4.5% were Corporal punishment is not just a few raps on the knuckles with a ruler. It often means hitting a student on the bottom with a wooden paddle with considerable force. The mother of one of the Texas girls said that after her daughter was paddled “it almost looked like it had been burned and blistered, it was so bad.”
There have been reports of students suffering worse injuries, including blood clots and broken bones. The ACLU and Human Rights Watch described the case of Tim L., a Texas 5th grader, who was beaten so brutally in 2003 that his genitals were bruised and swollen and his mother reported having to “pull the underwear off his behind from the dried blood.” Corporal punishment has been linked to mental health problems in children. Studies have found that children who receive physical punishment are more likely to experience depression, suicide, and anti-social behavior. A Canadian study published this year found a connection between corporal punishment and alcohol and drug abuse. The case in favor of corporal punishment is remarkably thin. Supporters often invoke the injunction, “Spare the rod, spoil the child” or simply point to the long tradition of paddling children and say they see no reason to stop now. But there is not a great deal of social science evidence that paddling promotes better outcomes.

Bud Kennedy-“THAT IS CREEPY”
Do you care if it’s a man or a woman who spanks your daughter? No. It doesn’t matter, if she’s got it coming. Yes. I want a woman giving the punishment. I don’t want my daughter spanked by anyone. Absurd Springtown episode shows how swatting students is archaic, wrong and counterproductive. Men can paddle girls under revised Springtown school policy. When it does, they change it right back? For more than a year, Springtown school trustees had taken the bold, mid-1960s step of barring middle-aged men from administering the schoolhouse paddle to little girls. But the men didn’t like that rule. So now, in what Springtown considers progress, men can paddle girls again if a woman stands by.
Call it Springtown’s own little War on Women. Two mothers were belittled as whiners this week for raising valid complaints after a 49-year-old male assistant principal paddled their daughters, even though that was an obvious violation of the district’s year-old corporal punishment rule. If you didn’t care that a man was paddling a 95-pound girls cross-country runner in wind shorts — for a cheating case against a different girl — then consider the other case brought to school trustees Monday night.
For walking across art posters spread across a classroom floor, Cathi Watt’s daughter was not only paddled by a man. He also brought in a second man to watch. Jada Watt left with more than just bruises and humiliation. Springtown Police Chief Ed Crowdis confirmed Tuesday that a city police officer watched her get paddled. Then he gave her a ticket. Afterward, the vice principal asked the officer to issue a citation accusing the girl of the Class C misdemeanor juvenile charge of “disruption.” Cathi Watt’s comment to WFAA/Channel 8 summed it up well. “Two men giving her a swat behind closed doors,” Watt said. “That is creepy.” School trustees must have agreed. Sort of. They changed the policy to allow the vice principal to go back to paddling high school girls, but only in front of a woman, and only with a parent’s OK. Both boys and girls will be paddled no more than once each semester. If it’s that complicated, why bother? Superintendent Michael Kelley told reporters that Springtown parents want paddling offered as an optional “service.” The Reuters news agency quoted him as saying parents “call up” principals and ask, “Why don’t you just give ’em a swat?”
Imagine if sexuality came into play. We’d essentially be paying the school administrator to get his sexual thrills. There is no discussion of such an idea in this particular case, though it’s no great leap to imagine that it happened at some point. Harkening back to the 220,000 students that were physically punished in the 2005-2006 school year, even if only 0.1 percent of people are sadistic, it suddenly becomes a strong possibility that at least one of those cases was sexual in nature. Corporal punishment no longer has any place in modern society. We’ve developed to the point where force is no longer the only way to get a point across, and we’ve nothing positive to gain from paying administrators to partake in such questionable activity. Oh — did I mention that Springtown High School’s fall play is Greater Tuna?
COMMENTS: We at Teacherwhopaddle Exposed agree totally with Bud Kennedy, it’s creepy. The two girls who were beat with a paddle at Springtown Schools-their pictures are all over the internet. Both of them are cuties. I wonder if the forty nine year principal gets a thrill telling a cute teenage girl to stick her rear out so he can spank her. The thought of a grown man paddling a teenage girl is disgusting and repulsive. If you agree with me, leave us a comment. We want to hear from you.

HELP US SAVE THE CHILDREN
EXPOSE TEACHERWHOPADDLE-Four creepy women run the perverted weblog, Teacherswhopaddle. These women are doing nothing but promoting sadism and hatred. They hate with a passion anybody who disagrees with their very narrow and self-righteous philosophy. Kids they paddle are no different than a Jew was to a Nazis. These women are disgusting. They are true blue cowards. They get on the internet bragging about beating kids with a paddle, and they use alias names. They don’t tell us who they are or where they work. Help us find out what their real names are. They live in the state of Georgia. The one who calls herself, Renee on the internet, describes herself as a petite, red head. She is a principal at a middle school. Another one of these creepy women vainly claims to be a Jessica Simpson look alike. This woman is either a fourth or fifth grade teachers. She says she is a former cheerleader at the University of Alabama, and she is married to a doctor. If you know the names of these sinister women, let us know. You will be doing your part to prevent many children from being beat at school. Help us save the children.

Retiring the Paddle: Local School Boards Wipe Out Corporal Punishment in Urban Texas

by Stephanie Phillips & Richard Fossey — April 05, 2012

All urban school districts in Texas now ban corporal punishment. A majority of Texas school children attend schools where corporal punishment is prohibited..

Since colonial times, Americans have approved corporal punishment in schools as a means of disciplining students. In states where it is still permitted, educators enjoy a legal privilege to administer physical force on their students so long as they do so with reasonable restraint. Today, corporal punishment usually involves paddling students on the buttocks with a wooden board.

In the famous case of Ingraham v. Wright (1977), James Ingraham and Roosevelt Andrews, two junior high students, sued the Dade County Schools in Florida, arguing that school officials had inflicted harsh corporal punishment on them in violation of their constitutional rights. Ingraham and Roosevelt maintained that corporal punishment violated the Eighth Amendment’s ban against cruel and unusual punishment, and they also argued that the Fourteenth Amendment guaranteed them a due process hearing before they could be paddled.

Unfortunately for Ingraham and Roosevelt, the Supreme Court sided with the school district. In the court’s view, paddling the boys did not violate the Eighth Amendment because the amendment’s prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment only protected prisoners—not students in public schools. Furthermore, the court ruled, school authorities were not constitutionally required to give students a due process hearing before whacking them with a board.

After the Ingraham decision, American attitudes about corporal punishment began to change. At the time the Supreme Court ruled, only three states prohibited corporal punishment in the schools. After Ingraham, states began banning corporal punishment through either legislation or administrative regulations. Fourteen states abandoned the practice during the 1980s, eight states stopped paddling students in the 1990s, and five more states outlawed paddling during the last 12 years.

Today, only 19 states allow corporal punishment in the public schools, where it is largely confined to the states of the Rocky Mountain West and the South. Indeed, the South is a bastion of school paddling. Every Southern state permits it except Virginia, and Mississippi leads the nation in the percentage of its students who are paddled in the schools (Center for Effective Discipline, 2010).

LOCAL SCHOOL BOARDS HAVE WIPED OUT CORPORAL PUNISHMENT IN TEXAS CITIES

Just because corporal punishment is permitted, however, does not mean that educators are required to paddle their students. Local school boards can decide on their own initiative to ban the practice. This raises an interesting question: In states where corporal punishment is still allowed in schools, how many students attend schools where the practice has been abolished at the local level?

A recent study at the University of North Texas (Phillips, 2012) answered this question for the state of Texas. This study examined the student discipline policies of 1,025 Texas school districts and found that 868 districts permit corporal punishment, whereas only 157 districts ban the practice. This finding seems to suggest that corporal punishment is alive and well in Texas public schools.

But when the study examined student discipline policies by district size, the picture looks entirely different. Almost 4.8 million students are enrolled in the Texas public schools, but only about 1.9 million of them attend schools where corporal punishment is allowed. More than 2.9 million Texas students attend schools where local school boards have abolished the practice. In other words, 60% of Texas school children go to school in districts where corporal punishment has been outlawed.

Significantly, 32 of the state’s 35 largest school districts prohibit corporal punishment, and all 10 of the school districts classified as “major urban” by the Texas Education Agency have stopped paddling students, including the school systems in Austin, Dallas, El Paso, Fort Worth, Houston, and San Antonio. In short, although educators still paddle students outside the cities, corporal punishment has been virtually wiped out in urban Texas.

WHY IS THE TEXAS EXPERIENCE IMPORTANT?

Why is the Texas experience important? First, the elimination of corporal punishment in Texas cities suggests that corporal punishment in public schools may be evolving from a largely Southern phenomenon into a Southern rural phenomenon (although corporal punishment is also practiced in many Texas suburban districts as well). Studies of corporal punishment in other Southern states—particularly Georgia and Florida, which have large urban school districts—would help determine if the Texas trend of abolishing corporal punishment in the cities is a trend that extends throughout the South.

Second, Southern legislators may be reluctant to abolish corporal punishment in their states’ schools out of a mistaken belief that their constituents overwhelmingly support it. In fact, in Texas at least, most students attend schools where the wooden paddle has been outlawed. Perhaps the University of North Texas study will encourage the Texas legislature and other Southern legislatures to take the step that has already been taken in more than 30 states and abolish corporal punishment as means of disciplining school children.

In any event, the Texas study should be encouraging to corporal punishment opponents all over the United States. Numerous professional organizations condemn the physical punishment of children in the schools, including the American Medical Association (Orentlicher, 1992), the American Bar Association (1985), the American Psychological Association (1975), the American Academy of Pediatrics (2000), the National Education Association (1972, 2010), and the National Association of Secondary School Principals (2004), and most scholarly research has found that corporal punishment in schools has no value in shaping the healthy development of a child. It is heartening to learn that local school boards in urban Texas apparently agree with the experts and have stopped paddling children in the schools.

References

American Academy of Pediatrics. (2000). Corporal punishment in schools. Retrieved from http://aappolicy.aappublications.org/cgi/reprint/pediatrics;106/2/343.pdf

American Bar Association. (1985). Corporal punishment in child care & education institutions. Retrieved from http://www.americanbar.org/groups/child_law/policy/schools.html

American Psychological Association. (1975). Corporal punishment. Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/about/governance/council/policy/corporal-punishment.aspx

Center for Effective Discipline. (2010). Corporal punishment in U.S. public schools 2005-2006. Retrieved from http://www.stophitting.com/index.php?page=statesbanning

Ingraham v. Wright, 430 U.S. 651 (1977).

National Association of Secondary School Principals. (2004). Corporal punishment. Retrieved from http://www.nassp.org/Content.aspx?topic=47093

National Education Asociation. (1972). Report of the Task Force on Corporal Punishment.  Washington, DC: Author.

National Education Association. (2010, April 14). Letter the House Education and Labor Committee on Corporal Punishment in Schools. Retrieved from http://www.nea.org/home/38946.htm

Orenticher, D. (1992). Corporal punishment in the schools.  Journal of the American Medical Association, 267(23), 3205-3208.

Phillips, S. (2012). The demographics of corporal punishment in Texas school districts: A law and policy analysis (Unpublished dissertation to be defended March 2012). University of North Texas, Denton, Texas.

———————————————————————————————————————————————————

MARC ECKO REVEALS THE FACTS:

In all 50 states it is illegal to hit a prisoner:

In all 50 states it is illegal to hit someone in the military:

In all 50 states it is illegal to hit an animal:

Corporal Punishment in public schools is legal in the following 19 states: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Wyoming.

220,517 students received some form of corporal punishment in school in 2006 (according to the latest report of the US Dept of Education Office of Civil Rights Data)

Of these students, 20,000 needed to seek medical attention for injuries suffered at the hands of their educators.

In 19 states a student can be paddled in school for being late to class, acting out, going to the bathroom without permission, or even failing a test:

Students who are paddled have a higher likelihood of dropping out of school:

High school drop outs earn approximately $10,000 less than workers with diplomas:

High school drop outs are more likely to be unemployed or incarcerated:

High school drop outs cost taxpayers $8 Billion annually in public services:

Over their lifetimes, high school drop outs from the Class of 2011 will cost the US over $200 BILLION in services and lost tax revenue:

Most people in the US don’t even realize that paddling children in school remains legal in 20 19 states:

All US citizens have the right to due process prior to receiving a sentence or punishment.

Yet, students in the 19 states where paddling is legal in schools are often denied this fundamental right.

Students in schools were paddling is administered:

Often have no format to appeal such punishment.

May not have the ability to raise concerns over the legitimacy of the claims made against them.

May not have the ability to raise concerns over the severity of the punishment being administered for their presumed violations.

The practice of paddling children in school is one riddled with abuse, social, and racial inequality, and often exists without defined standards or effective definition.

Victims and their families often lack the independent financial resources, support systems, processes, and reasonable formats in order to voice their concern over such abuses.

The US is the only industrialized country that still allows students to be hit in school.

Even Iran does not allow its students to be hit in school.

3 of 10 lowest ranking states in terms of education excellence are among the 19 that allow paddling in schools. (According to Education Week’s Annual Education Report Card dated 1/14/10)

8 of the top 10 ranking states in terms of education excellence have banned paddling in schools. (According to Education Week’s Annual Education Report Card dated 1/14/10)

A Sadistical Coach Beats A Helpless Child

CROSSVILLE, Tenn. – A legendary local football coach is in trouble, accused of going too far with corporal punishment on a student.
A grand jury indicted Vaughn Davis on charges of simple assault. This after the mother of a 14-year-old special needs student complained to the district attorney.
“Mr. Davis took him outside and had him bend over a rock and paddled him three times,” said the child’s mother, who NewsChannel 5 did not identify to protect the identity of the child.
She said her son is recovering from a traumatic brain injury from an ATV crash and any further trauma like padding to his head or spine could have killed him. The boy was on the school’s “No Paddle” list, but the mother said it still happened.
“I was very devastated … appalled and disappointed,” she added.
She said her son is sometimes slow to respond to instructions, but said she’s not entirely sure why he was paddled. The Cumberland County director of schools declined to comment about the case.
“Some things were done that were horrible or even deplorable,” said attorney Alan Rose, who along with colleague Richard Brooks plans to file a federal civil lawsuit on behalf of the student.
Davis is very well-known and respected in the Crossville area. Over nearly a half century he’s coached and taught thousands of children. As a coach he’s won more than 14 championships and his name is on the Homestead Elementary school football field. There is even a day — September 24 — named for his honor in the town.
“He happened to be one of my teachers when I was growing up,” said District Attorney Randy York who presented the case to the grand jury. York said he couldn’t ignore the details of the complaint.
“The mother of the child brought this to our office and I felt that the Grand Jury should look at the case,” said York. York said criminal indictments in relation to corporal punishment are extremely rare. Such cases are usually settled within the school or in civil lawsuits. Davis is headed to criminal court. He could not be reached for comment.
The Cumberland County schools director said Davis is no longer teaching at Homestead Elementary school.
(If this guy gets convicted, It will go a long way in helping our cause.)
__________________________________________

By Sarah Gonzalez
MIAMI (2012-03-15) -Our story on Florida schools that paddle students was picked up by NPR and we’ve gotten some comments from folks who wondered about a sexual element to spanking.
John Shelley wrote: “Why do they hit the kids in the butt? Is this a sexual thing?” Conky Swayze wrote: “There’s so much sexual connotation with spanking that it does walk in that grey area.” Some who have been on the receiving end of a paddle say people outside of their community just don’t understand their culture. Melynda Howell is the guidance counselor at Sneads High School in Jackson County Fla., which auses corporal punishment. She graduated from the high school and said the last time she got a spanking from a male principal, she was 13 years old, and she had gotten in a fight with another girl in the school.
“We don’t see any sexual element whatsoever,” Howell said. “The principal was a male authority figure just like my father, so there was no difference to us, to me.” Sneads, Fla. is a small town in the Florida Panhandle with a population of about 2,000.
Howell says in this part of the rural north, high school girls and boys are not considered too d to get a spanking at school. “Most kids in our area have that type of discipline at home so they’re more comfortable with it in the school environment, Howell said.
“If you don’t experience that in California or at home, of course you would not be as comfortable with that at the school level.”
Schools with paddling polices are required by law to bring in a witness, and notify the parents after the punishment is administered.
But most schools volunteer to ask parents for permission before students are paddled.
The Community Trusts School Administrators
Some Florida schools, like Sneads High School, have polices where school administrators can only spank students of the same gender.
The principal of the school, Laurence Pender, says he has never hit a female student. For that he calls in his assistant principal, Faye Parker.
But Pender says his small town would support him if he did paddle female students. He says parents expect him to act like a parent to students under his supervision.
“It’s not something that is joked about or laughed about. It’s a very serious thing,” Pender said. “Its punishment.”
Schools that want to use corporal punishment have to apply every three years, and hear testimony from parents in the community.
Outside of the Panhandle, the community in rural Madison, Fla. decided high school students are too mature to get paddled, according to Willie Williams, principal at Madison County Central elementary and middle school.
The community decided teenage girls and boys in middle school can still be paddled.
And Williams says the community trusts the school administrators to discipline students in this way.
He says school corporal punishment works well in a small town because everyone knows each other.
“If I were in a big community, where I wasn’t known, where I didn’t get a chance to speak at church… for students to know that I know their parents and grandparents and aunts and uncles, I don’t think it would be possible in an urban area. I really don’t.”
—————————————————————-
I know Sneads, Florida. It’s close to Lake Seminole in extreme north Florida. I’ve fished on Lake Seminole. My grandparents lived on the edge of the lake, close to the redneck town of Sneads. Sneads is a very impoverished area. It’s full of racism. You could easily hear the N word thrown out consistently. Maybe even by school administrators or the school guidance counselor. The guidance counselor who says she was beaten at the age of thirteen by a male principal. He probably told her to stick her rear end out. Most Americans would think this guy is some kind of pervert. Polls show seventy percent of the Americans population oppose school corporal punishment. Most American parents moderately spank their children, but they will not tolerate someone else spanking their child. School administrators in Sneads, Florida have no pride. They don’t care what people think of them.
I want to debate the school administers at Sneads-Laurence Pender and Faye Parker or the goofy school counselor Melynda Howell, but I believe they are too big a cowards to debate us. We will place the debate on you-tube. Maybe CNN will notice it. All arguments to keep school corporal punishment alive are intellectually bankrupt. Here’s what a friend of mine said about the pan-handle of Florida. He called it the Redneck Riviera. Rednecks are the ones beating kids in schools.
What is the graduation rate in Sneads, Florida? In Florida, it’s only seventy percent. What is it in Sneads? It’s probably less than seventy percent. Those schools in north Florida are some of the worst in America. What’s their graduation rate? I bet it is less than seventy percent. They are beating kids and causing them to drop out if school.
I need no course in human sexuality. Howell how do you feel about gay people? What causes a person to be gay? I think you hate gay people with a passion. You have a very narrow philosophy of life.

PREBLE STUDENTS SUBMIT ANTI-CORPORAL PUNISHMENT BILL TO CONGRESS
Last year, Preble social studies teacher Jeff Kline wanted his 9th graders to research national issues and create a new federal law. Then-Representative Steve Kagen, M.D. offered to work with the kids and offer his Capitol Hill know-how of the legislative process. What has resulted is the collaborative work of Kagen and five social studies classes known as H.R. 3027, or “The Abolishment of Corporal Punishment in Public Schools Act 2011,” in an effort to ban corporal punishment in schools.
The bill summary states: In order to aid in the overall well being of children attending public schools; this bill provides that no teacher or staff member of any public school can use any form of corporal punishment as a means of punishment or as a way to change behavior.
Corporal punishment is allowed in 19 states: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Wyoming.
The students’ research discovered Representative Carolyn McCarthy (D-NY) introduced a similar piece of legislation a year earlier that did not find much success beyond the House Education and the Workforce Committee. Through Kagen, the students’ bill proposal was brought to Representative McCarthy’s office this past spring.
Congresswoman McCarthy submitted the legislation on September 22 for consideration by the U.S. House of Representatives. Six other congressional representatives are co-sponsoring the bill: Michael Capuano (D-MA), Keith Ellison (D-MN), Bob Filner (D-CA), Donald Payne (D-NJ), Jared Polis (D-CO), and Robert Scott (D-VA).
“The wonder of the American democracy is any citizen can have an influence over federal law,” said Jeff Kline, Preble High School social studies teacher. “These students have created a bill, and through the help of current and former Congressional representatives, may very well have helped to establish a national law.”

THREE 13 YEAR OLD SWEETIES BEAT
CANKTON, LA. — Eighth-grader Taylor Castille stopped in her sixth-period class at Sunset Elementary School on Monday and excused herself to use the restroom before the bell rang. The closest restroom was closed, so she walked across the school to use another facility in the fifth-grade building and met up with two friends, Emily Eadie and Madeline Odom.
They admit that they were walking back to class after the tardy bell, and knew they were in trouble when principal Marquet Rideau caught them crossing the quad. The three 13-year-old eighth-graders thought they would get a tardy mark on their ID cards, or worse, morning detention.
But they did not get either. Instead, another teacher handed Rideau the school paddle and walked off, the girls said. Then, Rideau hit the girls one time each on their buttocks and sent them back to class, they said. “I was embarrassed,” Emily said. “I’ve never been in trouble before.”
Documentation the girls’ parents obtained from the school verified that the tardy was the three girls’ first discipline problem at the school, and that Rideau administered corporal punishment for the girls being tardy.
Word spread quickly about the incident. It happened in the quad, which can be viewed from classrooms and other students milled around during the paddling, the girls said. “I feel like we were singled out,” Taylor said. “I don’t know if she was having a bad day, but she took it out on us.”
The three are honors students. Emily headed the school’s Red Ribbon Week celebration and Taylor was nominated for the school’s student of the year, said Candace Guidry, Emily’s mother.
Guidry, Madeline’s mother, Tiffany Savoy, and Taylor’s mother, Cynthia Castille — all Cankton residents — were outraged when their daughters came home from school and told them what happened. More alarming was that the three parents signed forms in August that asked the school to not use corporal punishment on their children.
The mothers provided copies of the forms on which they checked: “I do not authorize Sunset Elementary School to use corporal punishment to discipline my child. … Let it be known that children who cannot be administered corporal punishment may be suspended or you will be asked to come and remove the child from the school should such action be warranted.”
The mothers went to the school Tuesday and demanded an explanation. They questioned whether the school would have notified them about the punishment. During their meeting with Rideau, the principal admitted that the girls were good students and said the paddling was to remind them to be well-behaved, the mothers said. “It was very, very inappropriate,” Castille said.
She and the other mothers no longer support corporal punishment in schools. “Not after this.” Furthermore, the punishment should be reserved for students with repeated discipline problems, the mothers said, citing the St. Landry Parish School Board policy.
They have filed a complaint with the school board and the Sunset Police Department. Officials at the St. Landry Parish School Board could not be reached for comment, and attorney Gerard Caswell did not return a phone call requesting comment.
Sunset Police Chief Alexcie Guillory confirmed that a complaint has been filed, but said he could not comment further. “They have filed a complaint and it’s under investigation,” Guillory said.
Ideally, the mothers would like Rideau to be charged with simple battery and be terminated, they said. The girls were marked by the paddling, at least one saying it hurt to sit hours after the incident and after they had finished trick-or-treating.

Alabama Should Move In The Right Direction

(I POSTED THIS ARTICLE ON NETWORK FIFTY FOUR—SCHOOL CORPORAL
PUNISHMENT.)

Huntsville, Ala., City Schools Ban Corporal Punishment, State Not Likely
to Follow
By Pamela Gifford

The Hunstville, Ala., City School Board unanimously approved the
elimination of the corporal punishment policy during their meeting on Aug.
18. There was no discussion or debate on the matter. This is a rarity in a
state that, as of 2008, was ranked No. 1 in the nation for number of
students paddled.
The United States is one of the few nations in the world which still allow corporal punishment in schools. More than half the states in the nation have made paddlings illegal. Just as recently as April, New Mexico’s
governor signed a bill that banned corporal punishment in her state.
“The decision on whether or not to use corporal punishment on a child is
one that is best left to a parent,” Gov. Susana Martinez said. While
paddling is legal in Alabama, the State Board of Education leaves the
decision in the hands of the individual school districts.
While many school districts have adopted a change of policy to disallow corporal punishment, many others haven’t even considered it an option. On the state level, Governor Robert Bentley and Mary Scott Hunter, both who serve on the Alabama State Board of Education, were contacted about their thoughts on the topic. Neither has responded. However, State Senator Shadrack McGill, stated that he wasn’t sure if a ban would come up in legislation. When asked if he would support such a bill, he had this to
say: “The Bible is very clear concerning corporal punishment… Discipline
and spankings are a training tool for teachers who raise my child 40 hours
per week in my absence, however there are limits and I do believe that you
can go too far.” And one Alabama teacher allegedly did go too far last
year. A 7th grader at Plainview High School in Rainsville, Alabama came
home with bruises after a teacher paddled him for not making a good grade.
The mother is currently suing Superintendent Charles Warren of the DeKalb County School District, Plainview Principal Ronald Bell, and Stuart
Mitchell, the teacher who administered the paddling. These instances of extremity are rare but it leaves a lot of parents wondering if the possibility of their child having an overly aggressive teacher is worth allowing schools to continue corporal punishment. Even children as young as 5 are subjected to school paddlings.
The sides of the debate are clear. Many people in Alabama believe in the same Bible philosophy that Senator McGill does. “Spare the rod, spoil the child” is a heavily leaned on concept and is why many school districts in the state still allow paddling. Many people believe that disallowing corporal punishment in schools leads to loss of authority and increased student violence.
On the other side of the debate are those who are outraged that taking a board to an animal, in the same manner a child would be paddled, would be illegal animal cruelty. Those against corporal punishment say that it makes a child more aggressive. Children are more effectively disciplined when they aren’t scared into submission.
And then there is the middle ground where the parent actually believes in spanking but fears instances like what allegedly happened at Plainville High School. Parental choice on this matter in Alabama is non-existent. If the school allows paddling, the school is under no legal obligation to notify the parent and that leaves many parents concerned.

FAKE RENEE’S RESPONSE

This is Renee of Teacherswhopaddle, who you LOVE to hate. Hey, I don’t hate you -I just think you are seriously misguided as to the
vitriol you spew at me and the others at TWP. As to the nutjob teacher at
Plainview, Alabama –That unmerited paddling would be the last he EVER gave if I were the principal. (Careful “Rev.”…Don’t hit the floor TOO hard in
shock!)
You mentioned “the middle road” which I actually am mostly in myself. While I lean pro with moderate application of c.p. for elementary
students, I also favor opt outs for parents opposed. Where we differ is
that I believe in elected school boards making school discipline policy
whereas you prefer state and federal professional politicians making those
policies. You probably hate this too but I believe in parents and
educators working together for the educational progress of all children.
Our differences couldn’t be more clear: Your top-down, centralized
state-knows-best vs. my belief in a bottom-up community centric and
parent-teacher driven education management.
Like night and day…

OUR RESPONSE TO FAKE RENEE

Hi. Renee, how’s the petite redhead?
I say you hate me, and you say I hate you. We probably wouldn’t get
anywhere with such an exchange. Even though I don’t think we have tingly
feelings for each other. You call the teacher at Plainview a nut-job. What
do you call a teacher who did this to a child? “I did not hold back as I
usually do and held the paddle with both hands. I then proceeded to
deliver 5 hard swats to the thin looking dress slack. Nashia REALLY
deserved this one! Nashia, the roughest girl in the school was reduced to
tears and clutching her rear as she was sent back to her class.” This
educator could have injured this child just like the child in Alabama was
injured. It’s hard for me to believe you would have any concern for the
kid in Alabama.
Have you seen the movie, The Help? My wife read the book, and said it was better than the movie. That’s been my experience, the book is always more intriguing. The movie is about the filthy rich in Jackson, Mississippi in the 1960’s, and the help they hired to help their family. They were African American women, of course. Many times the help were treated like they were sub-human. I’m old enough to remember when separate but equal laws were in full force. In public places you could see, water fountains and restrooms designated for black folk. Signs hung over these areas which read colored.
That’s humiliating. I also remember the debate if Federal Civil Rights
legislation ought to be passed, giving all people equal rights? Many
thought it was a local matter. The feds should leave us alone was the
prevailing attitude. People were mean and hateful towards blacks. Do you
think the Federal Government should have passed Civil Rights legislation
to help African Americans and other people of color? In my opinion
paddling kids is no different than denying someone their civil rights.
This would make a good point of debate for us. We should have a face to
face debate and put it on the second most popular site on the internet,
YouTube. Face-Book is the most popular. Through the organizations I work
with, The Hitting Stops Here! and Unlimited Justice, we can set up a
debate from anywhere.
You say you are moderate. So you say you travel the middle road on some social issues. Which ones, gay rights? abortion rights? Which ones? It’s hard for me to believe you are A moderate. On your blog, you suggested to your readers to take up the book—Going Rogue: An American Life by Sarah Palin. First of all, Sarah Palin is nothing more than a political
opportunist. Second, she is as far to the right as you can get on every
social issue facing America. Renee, you’re the same way. Tell me an issue
you are not to the extreme right on.
The biggest difference between you and I is not how we see government intervention, but on our concepts of justice and fairness. I agree are differences are like, “Night and day.” There is nothing fair or just about educators beating kids on the backside with a cheap piece of wood. Let’s debate this thing face to face. I concur with Gov. Susana Martinez, a
brave woman, “The decision on whether or not to use corporal punishment on a child is one that is best left to a parent.” The ways of Jesus and
Christian teaching–it should only be in the hands of parents. Take the
Bible literally–I think it teaches a parent should only spank a child.

HEY LOOK HERE. JESTIN AND I FINALLY MADE IT IN THE NEWSPAPER. THE FOLLOWING ARTICLE MADE IN TO THE NEWSPAPER’S IN TEXAS.
The article written a couple months ago by Ann Work about Assistant Principal Darrell Frazier spanking two seventeen-year old-girls has circulated all over the Internet and ended up in many newspapers in America. What do most Americans think of a man like
Frazier?
Recent polls indicate close to 70 percent of the American population
opposes corporal punishment in schools. I’m a longtime opponent of school
corporal punishment. I could write volumes on why I think school corporal
punishment is nothing but a primitive, barbaric way of disciplining
children and needs to come to an end in our great nation. The most
disgusting thing about school corporal punishment is these creepy men like
Frazier who get behind a closed door with a teenage girl, tell her to bend
over, and expose her backside in a vulnerable way so he can spank her.
There is nothing wholesome, good or Christian about this practice. It humiliates girls, shames them. Many girls who have fallen victim to a
school paddling can’t think about the incident without crying. As an adult
it’s no different, tears flair when the bad memory is recalled. I don’t
get it. Why would an educator want to be remembered in such a negative
way? I challenge Frazier to debate us over his practice of spanking girls.
Through the organizations I work with, The Hitting Stops Here! and
Unlimited Justice, we can set up a debate from anywhere. I’ve challenged
scores of educators who paddle to debate us. Not a one has accepted our
challenge. They are too big of cowards to debate us. All arguments to keep
corporal punishment alive are intellectually bankrupt. Educators who
paddle know this is true. That’s why they refuse to debate us.

JESTIN SPEAKS TO FAKE RENEE

Point well taken from our last exchange. However, my point still stands.
If anything, an opt in policy allows the greater protection to everyone.
Opt Out policies opens a school district to negative press, if not a
lawsuit. I understand shield laws as well, but it encourages paddling to
continue without thought of repercussion, may I add that this goes for
adults too I.E Jessica Serafin? If a paddler has been found to abuse a
child and/or adult, they should be brought to justice rather than the duck
and dodge game they play concerning shield laws. I can recall in a post
you agree with the court’s ruling concerning Serafin’s claims, why is
that? May you reminded that she was a legal adult. Able to do the
following without anyone’s permission.
Vote
Smoke
Get Married
Drive a car
Participate in pornographic movies
Fight and die for our country at war
She is even able to do this (Something I hope to do in my lifetime)

It does raise a couple questions though. First, if She was able to be
beaten as an adult, what’s not stopping anyone else from taking up this
right too? You know what I mean, there are too many unruly college
students out there and a little tap on the bum will teach them a good
lesson. Also, rather than writing up a student if they cheated on an exam
or paper, which there are many temptations due to the fact you can hire
people to write your paper, I bet if you put that you will be paddled 3
times with a wooden board, that will keep academic integrity in check.
How about bosses, you know there are teenagers who may not be adults,
according to you who come in late or who goof off, but a smack on the
bottom will keep production working. You may think, why not just fire
them? Well, it’s probably because our economy is in a bad position that
companies cannot hire new workers. So, my point still stands, smacking
lazy and later teenagers and adults at work by there bosses will make sure
the interests of the company are running smoothly.
As for your claim of state and local issue, I would have to concur with Wade. Segregation of school children was championed around the same concept you are for. If this is the case, should the Federal Government
have pushed its way through judicial activism to Integrate schools?
For more proof here, states that were staunchly in support of segregation attempt to nullify such court rulings and laws because the states felt that they were unconstitutional. The courts once again put that argument to bed. What about the curriculum of science classes? The teaching of creation science in public schools is championed by the same concept that it was the will of the community. This was true in times of the 1960s when an Arkansas statute prohibiting the teaching of the Theory of Evolution was challenged. The lawyers for the state of Arkansas did not bring up evidence, rather, they brought up the idea of local control and the wishes of the community. The court did not buy it and struck down the Arkansas statute.
You finally did not address my point of slavery and the fact that our
founding documents did not talk about slavery and our Founding Fathers did not discuss slavery anywhere. The only place you see slavery discovered in our founding documents is the 13th amendment radified after the Civil War. The same war that was fought due to the argument of who had more power, the states or union. The main reason our constitution was neutral on slavery was to protect the unity of the very young nation.
So, what’s my point. If we take your idea seriously, it would yield for
most reasonable persons, very strange answers. Also, when the safety of
children is put up before congress, it is everyone’s responsibility,
including the Federal Government. The states have been doing a very ppor
job of protecting children, rather, the states puts forth hoops that
families need to jump through and for the most part, they lose. The abuser
comes out the winner, once again, I invoke Serafin, the Chanceys, Memphis
Academy for Health Sciences, etc.
Finally, I have a very simple question. I do agree that politicians may
not be the most qualified on education issues and that is a discussion we
can have. My question for you though in like manner is: What makes you qualified to administer corporal punishment on school
children although you have admitted to having no formal training on how to
administer such punishment properly? Your response is greatly appreciated.

THE HITTING STOPS HERE ! CALENDAR
We have invited Alex Jones of KLBJ RADIO and KRS one, both leaders from Austin, TX, to participate in our events.
Please help us contact them.
See FAVORITES
to find out how at:
http://www.youtube.com/user/paulaflowe?feature=mhee
***************************
The Hitting Stops Here!
The 3-Iʼs Summer Campaign 2011:
Interrupting the Ill-informed With Information
CALENDAR:
Tues, July 19
Conference-call for having safe American schools:
More information: info@thehittingstopshere.com
8:30pm, EDT
Thurs, July 21
Report on Mississippi School Beatings
Recorded at Olelo TV Studios, Hawaii Andon America Speaks Blog Talk Radio.
6pm-8pm HT
Fri, July 22 Waikiki awareness evening
(details posted soon)
Sun, July 24
Waimanalo Beach Clean-up Community Day
(details posted soon)
3pm-5pm
Mon, July 25-Tues, July 26
Hawaii State Capitol Bldg. Corporal Punishment Awareness Rally
Beretania St. side of Capitol,
Sign-holding; paddle wielding
3pm-5pm
Thurs, Fri, Sat, July 28-30
Wash DC Campaign-Rally and March:
Concerned citizens–Join Us!
Participants, please display red, white and blue and carry signs in favor of enabling American school-age children to exercise their protective and due process rights, as granted to ALL US natural-born citizens by the US Constitution, 14th amendment.
(suggestions for signs & other details posted soon)
Fri, July 29 (evening)
University of Maryland Concert (no charge)
College Park, MD 20742 (301.405.2317)
The Hitting Stops Here! Meet-up!
More information
Twitter:
http://twitter.com/#!/TheHSH
email:
info@thehittingstopshere.com
8pm-11pm (details posted soon)
Sat, July 30Daytime:
NYRA Event
(see: http://www.youthrights.org/annualmeeting2011.php )
Rally for Ending US School Corporal Punishment In front of White House. (info@thehittingstopshere.com)
12pm-2pm
Evening
NYRA Annual Report, Awards & Board Election Voting
6pm-8pm
NYRA Bowling Party
The Hitting Stops Here! ¡°Meet up!¡±
(info@thehittingstopshere.com)
A Message To American Students, K-12 Marc Ecko Props!
The Paddle Dance performed by Paula Flowe and Nia Robertson
(details posted soon)
8pm-11pm
Tues, Aug 2-Wed, Aug 3
A look at the statistics–whoʼs really getting it?
US school corporal punishment Maps and Graphs Awareness Presentation:
Anguilla neighborhood canvassing.
(details posted soon)
Thurs, Aug 4
Anguilla Town Hall Meeting
Assembly of students and concerned community members regarding frequent and unaccounted for abuse occurring in South Delta School District.
5pm-8pm
Fri, Aug 5
MS State Capitol Campaign-Rally:
A Message to Gov. Haley Barbour and Lt. Gov. Phil Bryant from the NLGA
11am-2pm
Dinner and Back-To-School Party with The Hitting Stops Here! and other
childrenʼs rights advocates8pm-midnight (location TBA)
Sat, Aug 6
Anguilla Student Rights event:
Know Your Rights. Know What’s Going On.
Boys and Young Men Night out, led by Fredrick J. Robinson Sr.
Girls and Young Ladies Night out, led by Paula Flowe
Closing– led by Robinson Growing Stars and The Hitting Stops Here!
5pm-8pm (details posted soon)
Sun, Aug 7
Anguilla Community Event
The Bible Tells Me So
(details posted soon)
Mon, Aug 8
Anguilla Town Hall Meeting5pm-7pm
Tues, Aug 9-till success
(First day of school for South Delta School District)
South Delta School District Boycott begins,
entitled, When The Paddles EXIT, the Students Will ENTER (details
posted soon)
Fri, Aug 12
Madison Central HS Rally, Madison Cty, MS
8am-10am
Mississippi State Capitol Bldg. Rally
For Mississippi Students and Concerned Citizens
4pm-6pm
Evening out with Madison Central HS students and concerned citizens
8pm (details posted soon)
*Check our website Message Board for CALENDAR updates:
http://www.thehittingstopshereurstory.com/messageboard
**Please post the Press Release below throughout your website communities
and in local and national newspapers, through August 12, 2011:
PRESS RELEASE: Jul 28-Aug 12, 2011
The Hitting Stops Here! will be leading marching campaigns in Washington
DC and Mississippi for ending US school corporal punishment, Thurs., July
28-Fri., August 12.
Citizens everywhere, in support of having a ban placed on US school
corporal punishment, are urged to participate by attending the Wash DC and MS rallies or by leading neighborhood community rallies, forwarding photos and video footage to info@thehittingstopshere.com.
Paula Flowe, Exec. Director of THSH!, will deliver a speech throughout the summer campaign entitled, Sanctioned US School Abuse: The Time To Ban Is NOW!
Updates to be placed on our website MESSAGE BOARD at:
http://www.TheHittingStopsHere.com.

BRING BACK PADDLING?
A Comment by a victim:
I also went to Catholic school in the 70s when priests and brothers beat
the hell out of kids on the slightest provocation. I despise them to this
day and wouldn’t urinate on them if they were on fire. Hitting kids is
spineless and sick and creates more problems than it helps.

A FUNNY COMMENT LEFT ON THIS SITE.
The Teachers Who Paddle blog reads like a thinly disguised fetish site. A number of things tripped off my crap detector, e.g., the overly detailed descriptions of paddlings and implements, the idea that the
teachers were these young women who’d been cheerleaders and sorority members. And come on, Renee the TWP Editor was posting on the Network54 SF&R forum. Oh yeah, the paddles that they were discussing were apparently sold on a (now defunct) adult fetish site. Not sure how
much more obvious those people could get. If their blog was dedicated to
teachers whacking consenting adults across the rear, I doubt many people would care. But the repeated references to children sound kind of pedo-ish.
IS IT TRUE?
READ THIS STORY AS TOLD BY RENE, THE EDITOR OF THE SITE
TEACHERS WHO PADDLE.

Well, just as I told you last year, one evening I took my long paddle
(16¡å x 3 1/2¡å x 1/4¡å) home with me. It is exactly like the one we made
for Michelle and looks a lot scarier than it actually is. Fact is, it is so light that if we used it like the paddlings some describe on other web sites, it would probably BREAK!
And the reason I took it home? To find out for myself what that paddle actually does physically. And guess who was to be the recipient of an experimental paddling? YOURS TRULY! My husband John was a harder sell but I managed to cajole him into the experiment in my own special way’ And
don’t ask because I’m not telling!
Anyway, after tucking in Tyler, my 3 year old, we started our experiment:
Three swats just like the way we do at the school. While I coached John as to technique there was one MAJOR difference: No blue jeans or cotton underwear. The only thing between the pale skin of my bottom and that paddle was my rather thin silk pajamas!
Bending over the bed, I did have a butterflies in the stomach queasy
feeling and could see, in the mirrors reflection, the paddle held at an
angle just as I do when using it at the school. But I was determined to
find the answer to my concerns and nodded for John to start. Three loud,
stinging pops rang out. It did sting but at that moment I suddenly worried that our Tyler would start calling out for one of us! To my relief, he never did! So after reassuring John that I was o.k., I then checked my rear end in the bathroom. It was pink-red and stung a little but I would
have gladly taken this over momma’s strap! My reaction was this is
it?¡­No bruising?¡­No marks?¡­And barely red with only silk pajamas for protection¡ Also, the next morning I could barely see ANY evidence that there ever was an experiment!

ANOTHER FUNNY EYE CATCHER:
Fake Rene regularly writes on this Network54 site entitled School Corporal punishment. It’s nothing but a bunch of perverts exchanging ideas on spanking children. They take great delight in writing about children being smacked. I contacted a guy (Assumed internet name Garsgin) who left his email address, and challenged him to debate us, and we would post it on the most popular spot on the internet YouTube. He declined to debate us. In my exchanges with him, my eyebrows rose a speck when I read these words he wrote to me, “we got CP at school (we’re that old!) and we involve CP for role-play in our sex-lives.” I emailed him back, and asked nicely to tell me how that works out role-playing CP in their sex-lives. He never returned my email. Are these the words of a pervert? It comes from a contributor to the creepy Network54 site School Corporal Punishment. They call each other esteemed colleagues. They are esteemed perverts.

A MESSAGE FROM RENEE FROM JESTIN:
Rene, I am very curious why you would choose the former option of opting out then the ladder of opting in? It seems counter intuitive to me because in the former, students can fall victim of a beating, although the parent objects to the paddling, as I have seen in some cases whereas the latter would afford you greater protection. I thought you would feel that the latter of opting in protects everyone.
Moving on to another point, since you said that politicians are not qualified to make educational policy decisions, it provokes a natural question, what makes you qualified to administer corporal punishment as well? After all, you have failed to answer my questions where did you learn your buttocks striking techniques and if the College of Education at the University of Georgia ever discussed corporal punishment in theory or practice. This in itself is an interesting revelation if the practice is not discussed for the fact that Georgia sanctions corporal punishment.
You also failed to answer the question if the College of Education at the University of Georgia is able to certify that you are capable of administering corporal punishment properly without the physical injuries documented by concerned families to me or the mental side effects, as documented by psychologists and developmental scientist?
As for Chadie, they came to us for advocacy, not legal advice.
Unfortunately, you don’t know the games the school district is playing
to avoid taking responsibility for what they did. On the note of legal
advice, a lawyer who we spoke to is willing to take on paddling cases
and is ready to challenge paddling on the grounds of Title IX or to
challenge the Ingram decision itself. All I can tell you is the life of a paddle in American school is fading away.

A MESSAGE TO PROF. N FROM JESTIN:
Prof. N, I would like proof who Positive Discipline is most effective
towards and who is not. Please provide a clear basis for your response. As
for Nashia’S paddling incident and what should have been done rather than beating her senseless, as the story states, I have actually taken the liberty of sending that story to four particular experts on the issue of children, and I will post them up as they respond. They are getting the
full story as it comes from the TWP Website, no omissions.
As for the will of the community, argument, you’re back in the same
position as you were before. If everyone thought slavery was right and
it was the will of the community to have and own slaves, does that make
slavery right? You may be thinking that this is a false analogy, but this shows that hindsight truly is 20-20. People in the early and mid 1800s thought slavery was right and justified by the will of the community, religious teachings, etc. If you were a plantation owner at the time, you would feel that the the Federal government telling you not to own slaves, although the Bill of Rights or any part of the Constitution (Pre-Civil War) makes no mention of slavery, you would feel outrage. After all, if everyone thought slavery is right, it must be right. What could be so wrong? To be fair, let’s take a more modern issue where we can have somewhat more of a connection, the drinking age. Let’s say there was a certain community that felt that it was okay to sell beer to 15 year olds. When you question the leaders of the community about selling beer to teenagers, you learn that the town is primarily made up of Central Europeans and in their homeland, drinking at a young age is acceptable. If it was the will of the community to sell beer to teenagers, what gives the Federal government to impose its will on the town of Central Europeans with its 21 year old drinking age?  Once you understand this, you will understand why the will of the community argument doesn’t fly.
I am going to make a bold statement towards you Rene and other supporters of corporal punishment, but I assure my claim is supported by evidence. Look at it this way, we’re on the internet, so we can share ideas. I believe that one cannot truly defend corporal punishment honestly. Because, to do so, one must blatantly lie, make false statements,
bastardize hundreds of studies demonstrating its harmfulness by experts
who have studied this particular discipline for years, and other acts of
intellectual dishonesty. When corporal punishment supporters are
questioned or asked to prove their point for corporal punishment, they are unable to do so, but they feel the need to continue this practice.

AN EMAIL TO DR. JAMES E MCLEAN, DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA

Dear Dr. James E. McLean
I’m a retired pastor in the Presbyterian Church (USA), living in the cold weather state of Iowa. I am originally from the state of Alabama where I graduated from high school and college. One of the causes I have taken up in my years of ministry and in my retirement is to help bring an end to corporal punishment in our schools. So far thirty one states have outlawed corporal punishment in schools—New Mexico being the most recent.
I am writing to you today to share news about a blog on the internet
called Teachers Who Paddle. Four women operate this blog. They use alias names never revealing who they are or where they teach. One of the women who uses the name Michelle as her pseudonym. She claims she is a graduate of the College of Education at the University Of Alabama, a former college cheerleader, married to a doctor, and vainly a Jessica Simpson look alike. I think she teaches in the state
of Georgia. More than once Alias Michelle writes in vivid detail about the
children she has paddled. All four women who participate in the blog
Teachers Who Paddle brag and tell with great pride stories of how they
beat a child with a paddle. To me, corporal punishment is repulsive. It’s
scary to read spanking stories told with such enthusiasm.
One of fake Michelle’s paddling stories ends with these comments. (Those classroom management classes I took at Alabama did NOT include instructions on how to manage Miguel.) Miguel is an assumed name of a ten year old child she beat with a paddle. The crime, having a schoolboy crush on the teacher.

Below is the story written word by word by alias Michelle. Would you please read the story if you can bear to. I would like to know some facts about the college you administer. First of all, I would like to know if
the story below accurately demonstrates the mission and objectives of The College of Education and even that of the University? Having grown up in Alabama I know that corporal punishment is still sanctioned by state law. I am a victim of it. I want to know if the subject of corporal punishment is ever discussed in behavioral management courses, whether in theory or practice? If this is the case, are future educators certified by The College and/or The University that they are able to administer corporal punishment in such a manner, where there are no long lasting side effects, as cited by many developmental
scientist? Finally, as an expert on Education and children, I would like
to know what would be a better way to discipline this student? Could you
also please ask your colleagues for their opinions? I would like to post
your response on websites emphasizing positive discipline, and pro
corporal punishment websites.
Thank You,
Wade Ditty, Co-Founder of Teachers Who Paddle-Exposed

Here’s the story as written by the the women with the alias name Michell.

TEACHER FEATURE: MICHELLE PADDLES A FLIRT
This is TWP’s first segment on the teacher perspective we promised earlier this summer to retain in TEACHERSWHOPADDLE. This episode centers around sweet Michelle, our youngest teacher and the third paddling she ever gave. This new episode should be a heart-warming and touching saga that DOES reflect who we all really are as teachers: kind and sensitive but still firm when a situation requires the use of c.p. as a last resort.
Hi everyone! This is Michelle, the ex- Alabama Crimson Tide cheerleader turned 4th grade school teacher. I know what readers think when they hear about me from the Fan Mail I get weekly! Folks seem to think: Blond bomb-shell as teacher must be heaven on earth for those lucky kids! Well, the blond part aside, I am a teacher first and foremost. The kids in my class seem to grasp that fairly quickly. After a week or so
with homework assignments like as in any other class. Please understand, while I must be the adult in charge of my students. I also bring a cheerful and sunny disposition to my classroom. Only twice before had pused a paddle, once when a boy pushed a girl off a swing and the other for a sucker-punching playground bully.
But the third time was different¡­and was NO charm.
What was it for?
Flirting.WITH ME!
Please, dear readers, understand that this was not just winking or grinning at the °new teacher at the start of the year which I expect to go through every year for however long. No, this was very overt hugging by an infatuated 10 year old boy I will name Miguel. This flirting consisted of random hugs initiated by Miguel throughout the day and I tried unsuccessfully to stop this by conferences with his parents and Mr. Smith, our principal. After those meetings, the unwanted contact would stop and later resume as nothing had ever been said.
Since I was the only teacher in our school who could speak a little Spanish; moving Miguel to Jenny’s class was not a good option. (I work with a resource English as a Second Language (ESL) teacher who works with a dozen other kids in our school 1 hour a day.)
Everyone told me that Miguel must be held to the same standard of behavior as all the other students. That meant Miguel had to be penalized for his inappropriate touching of a school staff person. And as his teacher, I had to warn him of the consequences of his actions -Including c.p. I certainly hoped it would never come to that but did, in front of the resource teacher and Mr.Smith, reiterate the school policy to Miguel and all the possible sanctions. His resource teacher did translate some for me since I just know enough Spanish to get by Miguel’s parents also were made aware and understood completely.
Right away, Miguel had his computer time suspended the next time he attempted a hug. At first, that seemed to work but the NEXT day I would have to repeat the sanction. Then, Miguel started repeating the attempts to hug later in the day. So, my next step was the recess sit-in. That meant Jenny or I had to take turns staying in to watch him. This got to be a drag when Miguel was sitting in during EVERY recess! As Jenny jokingly remarked one day, I think your pint-sized boyfriend wanna be actually enjoys sitting in with you. And not me! Jenny said that only in jest but she had a point -Recess sit-ins for more than a week were not working.
The next day, at the start of class, I told Miguel, I’m not keeping you in recess anymore because it is NOT working. Rather, the next option is this. I then pulled out the paddle.Miguel, I don’t know what else to do. And Mr. Smith WILL send you to the alternative school if he hears about ANY more trouble¡­Understand? I implored. Miguel nodded and seemed to understand.
I had actually hoped the threat of removal from my class would cause a change in Miguel¡’s behavior before the paddle would be a factor. But I was mistaken.Later that morning, Miguel got up from his desk as if to ask me something. He had done likewise on previous days and would walk up behind my large desk in the front and place his arms around my shoulders while starting to ask a question. Every prior time Miguel did that, I penalized him with a recess sit-in. But this time had to be different because I had already warned him.
As he approached my desk, all I could think was Dear Lord, please cause Miguel to remember what I told him earlier! My prayer was NOT answered as Miguel placed his right arm around my
shoulder and leaned into me and started to speak. But I had warned Miguel about what would happen the next time he touched me inappropriately and immediately shushed him while reaching for the one teacher tool I hoped would be unnecessary: My 16¡å x 3 1/2 x 1/4 paddle.
I took Miguel to the conference room after getting Wendy as a witness.
As Wendy put aside the papers she was grading, I explained the whats and whys and she understood. She asked if I wanted her to do the paddling but I felt that if one of my kids was to be paddled -I would be the one to do it. Miguel was already starting to cry and pleaded. “Please don’t paddle me, I’m sorry.”
I replied, “Miguel, I hate doing this but you give me no other option than to send you to the office and if Mr. Smith hears about any more inappropriate touching,you will be removed from my class AND THIS SCHOOL, Understand?
A tearful Miguel pleaded, “I really like you, Miss J. Please don’t.” Speaking in a soft tone I implored. ‘Everyone KNOWS you like me but you must also respect me as you teacher and the first step in that is when your teacher tells you NOT to do something -Do not do it!”
Continuing, I told Miguel,I am going to give you 2 swats, o.k.? And I hope we never have to come back here again.
Miguel nodded as I had him turn to the wall and bend over with his hands pressed against the wall. Seeing that nothing was in the back pockets of his blue jeans, I lined up the top edge of my paddle with the top edge of Miguel. I then placed my left hand over Miguel’s back belt loop as my right hand held the paddle at a 90 degree angle.
I swung the paddle briskly.
SMACK! Miguel let out a owww.
I swung the paddle again just wishing to be done with it.
SMACK! Miguel flinched with another owww.
He cried.
After a few minutes, Wendy took him back to class.
Those classroom management classes I took at Alabama did NOT include
instructions on how to manage Miguels.